Shades of Dubuque

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Trappist Caskets: Alexander Simplot, Dubuque’s Civil War Artist

On April 22, 1861, more than 3,000 Dubuque residents gathered at the city’s Jones Street levee on the Mississippi River to see the Jackson...

Trappist Caskets: Irving School Recollections

Dubuque’s Irving School has a long history, dating back to 1866 when the school was known as the “West Dubuque School.” The original school,...

Trappist Caskets: Dubuque’s Washington Square

Dubuque’s Washington Park dates back to the city’s very beginnings. In 1833, G.W. Harrison surveyed and laid out the two-acre square originally slated to...

Trappist Caskets: Dubuque’s Frederick W. Kaltenbach

Dubuque can lay claim to many fine, upstanding citizens, but as far as I know, the city has produced only one person who was...

Trappist Caskets: John Deere Comes to Dubuque

Seventy-five years ago on March 12, 1947, the first “M” tractor rolled off the assembly line at the brand new “John Deere Dubuque Works...

Trappist Caskets: James Beach and His Soap Factory

Perhaps no one helped clean up old Dubuque more than soap manufacturer James Beach of the firm James A. Beach & Sons. James, a...

Trappist Caskets: Ice Harvesting

A window sign requesting an ice delivery would look pretty strange in the 21st century, but back in the 1800s and early 1900s, the...

Trappist Caskets: Dr. Asa Horr – Dubuque’s Early Physician, Weatherman, and...

Everyone likes to talk about the weather. Some even spend an inordinate amount of time complaining about it, especially when the snow flies and...

Trappist Caskets: Dubuque’s Peony Trail

In May, peonies throughout the Midwest begin to burst into big, showy blooms – a riot of red, pink, and white. One of the...

Trappist Caskets: The Wellington Boulder

Dubuque’s Linwood Cemetery is home to some very unusual monuments. A particularly unique one is a huge boulder that juts out of the ground...