Shades of Dubuque

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Trappist Caskets: Dubuque’s Historic Brick Making Industry

Downtown Dubuque boasts an abundance of historic, red brick buildings. Many were built using locally produced brick. Back in the mid to late 1800s...

Trappist Caskets: Iowa’s Oldest House

The historic log cabin sitting proudly on a hilltop at Dubuque’s Mathias Ham Historic Site has the distinction of being the city’s and Iowa’s...

Trappist Caskets: Sunnycrest at 101

Sunnycrest Manor, the Dubuque County-owned nursing home, officially opened nearly 101 years ago on August 13, 1921 as a tuberculosis sanatorium – a place...

Trappist Caskets: John Deere Comes to Dubuque

Seventy-five years ago on March 12, 1947, the first “M” tractor rolled off the assembly line at the brand new “John Deere Dubuque Works...

Trappist Caskets: Ice Harvesting

A window sign requesting an ice delivery would look pretty strange in the 21st century, but back in the 1800s and early 1900s, the...

Trappist Caskets: Col. Joseph B. Dorr’s Vases

Joseph Bartlett Dorr wasn’t a native Dubuquer, but he is counted among the city’s Civil War heroes. Born in New York on August 5,...

Trappist Caskets: Irving School Recollections

Dubuque’s Irving School has a long history, dating back to 1866 when the school was known as the “West Dubuque School.” The original school,...

Trappist Caskets: Dubuque’s Shot Tower

Lead mining and smelting attracted more 19th century settlers to the Upper Mississippi River Valley than fur trading or farming. But long before the...

Trappist Caskets: Dubuque’s Peony Trail

In May, peonies throughout the Midwest begin to burst into big, showy blooms – a riot of red, pink, and white. One of the...

Trappist Caskets: The Community of Eagle Point

When most people hear the name Eagle Point, they think of Dubuque’s beautiful park high on the bluff above the Mississippi River. But back...